General Knowledge 2017 - 60



1.
Who has become the new Chief Minister of Tamil Nadu?

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Octopi change colours when they become frightened. Normally they are a brownish colour, but can change to green or blue when fear sets in      .. More >>

cackle:
n.
1.the sound made by a hen after laying an egg
2.noisy talk
3.a loud laugh suggestive of a hen's cackle cackle v.
1.talk or utter in a cackling manner
2.squawk shrilly and loudly, characteristic of hens
3.emit a loud, unpleasant kind of laughing      .. More >>

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Best Honeymoon Spots in India

Manipur

One of Indias seven sisters of the North East, Manipur may yet again not be a common choice, but then, thats what makes it brilliant. Untouched natural beauty, the unique Lok Tak Lake, friendly people, midnight bazaars and bragging rights for the rest of your life what more could you ask for?

The possessive case of a noun or pronoun indicates ownership or possession.

Pronouns such as his, her, its, my, mine, your, yours, their, theirs, our, and

ours are all possessive case words.


Here are several rules for the possessive case.


A. Most singular nouns form their possessive by adding an apostrophe

and an s. (the baboon’s food; the girl’s sweater; Marx’s teachings; Burns’s

poetic lines; Dickens’s characters)


B. To form the possessive of a singular noun that ends with an s sound,

take one of two actions.


   1. If a name of two or more syllables ends in an eez sound, the possessive

is formed without an additional s. (Ulysses’ friends; Archimedes’

theories)


   2. Add an apostrophe and an s if the word would not be difficult to

pronounce. (dress’s cost; quartz’s essence)

C. Add only an apostrophe to form the possessive of a plural noun that

ends in s. (the boys’ gymnasium; the Murphys’ home)

D. If a plural noun does not end in s, add an apostrophe and an s. (the

men’s department; the mice’s hiding spots)


E. Use the possessive form for only the last name in compound nouns for

organizations, literary titles, businesses, and relatives. If owned separately,

use the possessive for both names.


Tom’s and Pete’s reputations (separate reputations)

Procter and Gamble’s sales (combined ownership)

mother-in-law’s magazines (one woman’s ownership)

mothers-in-law’s magazines (two or more women’s ownership)


F. For acronyms (words formed from the first letters of a series of words),

add an apostrophe and an s.


the NHL’s (National Hockey League’s) members

AARP’s (American Association of Retired People’s) membership

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