How much do you know about spy films?


How much do you know about spy films?


1. Who played the male and female leads in the 2001 spy saga 'The Tailor of Panama'?

2. Who played the male and female leads in 'The Spy Who Came In From The Cold' (1965)?

3. Who played the male lead in the 1966 film 'The Quiller Memorandum'?

4. In 1942 Warner Bros. made a spy film which reunited three of the stars of 'The Maltese Falcon' -Bogart,Astor and Greenstreet.What was it called?

5. What was the name of the 1965 film version of a popular Len Deighton book which introduced us to an intelligence agent named Harry Palmer, played by Michael Caine?

6. In 1966 James Mason starred in a film version of John Le Carre's spy novel 'Call for the Dead'.What was it called?

7. Who played the female lead role in the 2001 release 'Enigma'?

8. Who played the male and female leads in the Alfred Hitchcock 1935 release 'The 39 Steps', still the best version despite being remade several times since?

9. Who played the two lead male roles in the 1959 release 'Our Man in Havana'?

10. Who played the starring role in the 1960's/1970's series about 'Our Man Flint'?

11. And who played the starring role in the even sillier 1960's/1970's series about a secret agent named Matt Helm?

12. Who starred in the 1996 release Mission: Impossible and its sequel in 2000?

13. Who played the male and female leads in the 1990 release 'The Russia House'?

14. Who played the male lead role in the 1985 release 'The Man with One Red Shoe'?

15. Who played the male and female leads in the 1938 Hitchcock release 'The Lady Vanishes'?


Answer:
1. Pierce Brosnan and Jamie Lee Curtis. 2. Richard Burton and Claire Bloom. 3. George Segal. 4. 'Across the Pacific'. 5. 'The IPCRESS File'. 6. 'The Deadly Affair'. 7. Kate Winslet. 8. Robert Donat and Madeleine Carroll. 9. Alec Guinness and Noel Coward. 10. James Coburn. 11. Dean Martin. 12. Tom Cruise. 13. Sean Connery and Michelle Pfeiffer. 14. Tom Hanks. 15. Michael Redgrave and Margaret Lockwood.

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    Onomatopoeic words are those which seem to sound like their meaning. The most obvious examples are verbs relating to the noises which animals make, e.g. cows moo and cats mew or meow.



    If the vowel sound in a word is short, an onomatopoeic word usually signifies a short, sharp sound. If it is long (indicated in the International Phonetic Alphabet by ) then the word usually signifies a longer, slower sound. Compare pip /pip/ which is a short sound with peep /piip/ which is a long sound.



    Particular combinations of letters have particular sound associations in English.


    gr- at the beginning of a word can suggest something unpleasant or miserable, e.g. groan [make a deep sound forced out by pain or despair], grumble [complain in a bad-tempered way], grumpy [bad-tempered], grunt [make a low, rough sound like pigs do, or people expressing disagreement or boredom], growl [make a low, threatening sound].


    cl- at the beginning of a word can suggest something sharp and/or metallic, e.g. click [make a short sharp sound], clang [make a loud ringing noise], clank [make a dull metallic noise, not as loud as a clang], clash [make a loud, broken, confused noise as when metal objects strike together], clink [make the sound of small bits of metal or glass knocking together]. Horses go clip-clop on the road.


    sp- at the beginning of a word can have an association with water or other liquids or powders, e.g. splash [cause a liquid to fly about in drops], spit [send liquid out from the mouth], splutter [make a series of spitting sounds], spray [liquid sent through the air in tiny drops either by the wind or some instrument], sprinkle [throw a shower of something onto a surface], spurt [come out in a sudden burst].


    ash- at the end of a word can suggest something fast and violent, e.g. smash [break violently into small pieces], dash [move or be moved violently], crash [strike suddenly violently and noisily], bash [strike heavily so as to break or injure], gash [a long deep cut or wound].


    wh- at the beginning of a word often suggests the movement of air, e.g. whistle [a high pitched noise made by forcing air or steam through a small opening], whirr [sound like a birdís wings moving rapidly], whizz [make the sound of something rushing through air], wheeze [breathe noisily especially with a whistling sound in the chest], whip [one of these or to hit with one of these].


    -ckle, -ggle, or -zzle at the end of a word can suggest something light and repeated, e.g. trickle [to flow in a thin stream], crackle [make a series of short cracking sounds], tinkle [make a succession of light ringing sounds], giggle [laugh lightly in a nervous or silly way], wriggle [move with quick short twistings], sizzle [make a hissing sound like something cooking in fat], drizzle [small, fine rain].
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