General Knowledge 24

Test # 24


1.
Which of the following women leaders from India has been presented with USIBC global leadership award?

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Phobia :
acousticophobia : fear of noise.      .. More >>

domesticated:
adj.
1.converted or adapted to domestic use
2.accustomed to home life      .. More >>

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Rules to play Bank pool

Calling Shots

On every shot the ball, the pocket and the path of intended cushions must be obvious or specifically called prior to commencing the shot. In the event that a called ball takes a different path to the pocket than that which was called, the pocketed ball does not count and it is spotted without penalty to the shooter.
It is the shooters responsibility to call any shot that is not obvious. Any single rail bank is considered obvious, unless a contrary shot was called. A ball pocketed contrary to the shooters called shot does not count; it is spotted without further penalty, and the shooters inning is over.
At any time the shooter assumes a shooting stance without having already called their shot, the opponent or tournament official may inquire as to what shot is being attempted. The shooter must honor such a request prior to commencing their shot. Failure to call a shot upon request shall be interpreted as an intentional safety; any pocketed balls are spotted without further penalty, and the shooters inning is over.
Any multicushion shot is considered not obvious. In the event that a ball is pocketed on a multicushion shot without prior calling, the shooter has no recourse if either the tournament official or the opponent contends that their shot was not obvious. The disputed ball does not count; it is spotted without further penalty, and the shooters inning is over.
If an adjacent cushion or other object balls lie so close to the called ball that the cue ball might strike either the adjacent cushion or other balls first, it is the responsibility of the opponent to summon a tournament official or the designated house man prior to the shot, to rule whether the shot is clean or not, otherwise the benefit of the doubt is afforded the shooter.
When a called ball contacts either the cushions or pocket points along the rails adjacent to the called pocket on its final approach toward the pocket, such contact does not count as a bank in defining the called shot. If an otherwise legal called bank shot is pocketed in such a manner, the ball counts as long as the shot conforms with the shooters called intentions, and no foul or scratch occurs.

Onomatopoeic words are those which seem to sound like their meaning. The most obvious examples are verbs relating to the noises which animals make, e.g. cows moo and cats mew or meow.



If the vowel sound in a word is short, an onomatopoeic word usually signifies a short, sharp sound. If it is long (indicated in the International Phonetic Alphabet by ) then the word usually signifies a longer, slower sound. Compare pip /pip/ which is a short sound with peep /piip/ which is a long sound.



Particular combinations of letters have particular sound associations in English.


gr- at the beginning of a word can suggest something unpleasant or miserable, e.g. groan [make a deep sound forced out by pain or despair], grumble [complain in a bad-tempered way], grumpy [bad-tempered], grunt [make a low, rough sound like pigs do, or people expressing disagreement or boredom], growl [make a low, threatening sound].


cl- at the beginning of a word can suggest something sharp and/or metallic, e.g. click [make a short sharp sound], clang [make a loud ringing noise], clank [make a dull metallic noise, not as loud as a clang], clash [make a loud, broken, confused noise as when metal objects strike together], clink [make the sound of small bits of metal or glass knocking together]. Horses go clip-clop on the road.


sp- at the beginning of a word can have an association with water or other liquids or powders, e.g. splash [cause a liquid to fly about in drops], spit [send liquid out from the mouth], splutter [make a series of spitting sounds], spray [liquid sent through the air in tiny drops either by the wind or some instrument], sprinkle [throw a shower of something onto a surface], spurt [come out in a sudden burst].


ash- at the end of a word can suggest something fast and violent, e.g. smash [break violently into small pieces], dash [move or be moved violently], crash [strike suddenly violently and noisily], bash [strike heavily so as to break or injure], gash [a long deep cut or wound].


wh- at the beginning of a word often suggests the movement of air, e.g. whistle [a high pitched noise made by forcing air or steam through a small opening], whirr [sound like a birdís wings moving rapidly], whizz [make the sound of something rushing through air], wheeze [breathe noisily especially with a whistling sound in the chest], whip [one of these or to hit with one of these].


-ckle, -ggle, or -zzle at the end of a word can suggest something light and repeated, e.g. trickle [to flow in a thin stream], crackle [make a series of short cracking sounds], tinkle [make a succession of light ringing sounds], giggle [laugh lightly in a nervous or silly way], wriggle [move with quick short twistings], sizzle [make a hissing sound like something cooking in fat], drizzle [small, fine rain].
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