Prepositions - Without

Prepositions - Without

1. Without indicates the absence of somebody.
I can't live without you.
Please don't leave without me.

2. Without means not having.

Pattern: verb + without + (any) noun
That young mother manages without any help.
We are without money this month.

3. Without means not using.

Pattern: verb + noun + without + noun
We did the crossword puzzle without a dictionary.
She can't read without her glasses.

4. Without means not performing an action.

Pattern: without + verb in gerund form
She passed the test without studying.
He left without saying good-bye.

5. Expressions

without a doubt—certainly
She is without a doubt the best chairman we have ever had.

without fail—a demand or promise to do something Be here at six A.M. without fail.
I will finish within three days without fail.

without ceremony—immediately and quietly
He took charge without ceremony and began to work.

that goes without saying—that is understood to be true
You will be paid well for your work; that goes without saying.
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    Makeover Tips For Hair

    Dont wash Your Hair Frequently

    Wash your hair every 2-3 days, for proper regulation of natural hair oils. Washing your hair less often will also help regain your hairs natural body and luster.Many women shampoo their hair less often than Saunders. Melissa Capasso, an artist in Brooklyn, N.Y., shampoos her long, thick curls once a week. If I shampoo more than that, my hair dries out, it loses its natural curl, and it gets frizzy and unmanageable.

    Different kinds of adverbs go in different positions in a clause. Here are some general rules (Note: these rules apply both to one-word adverbs and to adverb phrases of two or more words.)

    Verb and object
    We do not usually put adverbs between a verb and its object.

    [...adverb + verb + object] [verb + adverb + object]
    I very much like my job. (NOT I like very much-my job.)
    [...verb + object + adverb]
    She speaks English well. (NOT She speaks well English.)

    Initial, mid and end position

    There are three normal positions for adverbs:
    a. initial position (at the beginning of a clause)
    - Yesterday morning something very strange happened.
    b. mid-position (with the verb - for the exact position)
    - My brother completely forgot my birthday.
    c. end position (at the end of a clause)
    - What are you doing tomorrow?
    Most adverb phrases (adverbs of two or more words) cannot go in mid-position. Compare:
    - He got dressed quickly. He quickly got dressed.
    - (Quickly can go in end or mid-position.)
    - He got dressed in a hurry. (NOT He in a hurry got dressed.)
    - (In a hurry cannot go in mid-position.)

    What goes where?
    a. initial position
    - Connecting adverbs (which join a clause to what came before). Time adverbs can also go here .
    - However, not everybody agreed. (connecting adverb)
    - Tomorrow I've got a meeting in Cardiff, (time adverb)

    b. mid-position
    - Focusing adverbs (which emphasize one part of the clause); adverbs of certainty and completeness; adverbs of indefinite frequency; some adverbs of manner.
    - He's been everywhere — he's even been to Antarctica, (focusing adverb)
    - It will probably rain this evening, (certainty)
    - I've almost finished painting the house, (completeness)
    - My boss often travels to America, (indefinite frequency)
    - He quickly got dressed, (manner)

    c. end-position

    Adverbs of manner (how), place (where) and time (when) most often go in end-position.
    - She brushed her hair slowly. (manner)
    - The children are playing upstairs. (place)
    - I phoned Alex this morning. (time)
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