Prepositions - Opposite

Prepositions - Opposite

1. Opposite means facing; across from.

Pattern: verb + opposite + noun
I sat opposite him at the library last night.
My house is opposite the drugstore.
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    Precautions while using Securing Email

    Spoofing

    False messages may be inserted into mail system of another user. It can be accomplished from within a LAN, or from an external environment using Trojan horses. Passwords are there to protect your account; without passwords we would be lost. Make sure your password is complicated; do not use your name, or last name. For example, do not put in John because the first thing that hackers will do is to guess your password based on your name. Don t use a phrase or use a pet name that most people know about. For example, do not put in MyPetMaddy or ShowUsYouFeelGood . Try to use a complicated code like mkael092 or use a code like this 09484M92 , so it is impossible to guess. Choose a password you have not previously used on your account before.

    Different kinds of adverbs go in different positions in a clause. Here are some general rules (Note: these rules apply both to one-word adverbs and to adverb phrases of two or more words.)

    Verb and object
    We do not usually put adverbs between a verb and its object.

    [...adverb + verb + object] [verb + adverb + object]
    I very much like my job. (NOT I like very much-my job.)
    [...verb + object + adverb]
    She speaks English well. (NOT She speaks well English.)

    Initial, mid and end position

    There are three normal positions for adverbs:
    a. initial position (at the beginning of a clause)
    - Yesterday morning something very strange happened.
    b. mid-position (with the verb - for the exact position)
    - My brother completely forgot my birthday.
    c. end position (at the end of a clause)
    - What are you doing tomorrow?
    Most adverb phrases (adverbs of two or more words) cannot go in mid-position. Compare:
    - He got dressed quickly. He quickly got dressed.
    - (Quickly can go in end or mid-position.)
    - He got dressed in a hurry. (NOT He in a hurry got dressed.)
    - (In a hurry cannot go in mid-position.)

    What goes where?
    a. initial position
    - Connecting adverbs (which join a clause to what came before). Time adverbs can also go here .
    - However, not everybody agreed. (connecting adverb)
    - Tomorrow I've got a meeting in Cardiff, (time adverb)

    b. mid-position
    - Focusing adverbs (which emphasize one part of the clause); adverbs of certainty and completeness; adverbs of indefinite frequency; some adverbs of manner.
    - He's been everywhere he's even been to Antarctica, (focusing adverb)
    - It will probably rain this evening, (certainty)
    - I've almost finished painting the house, (completeness)
    - My boss often travels to America, (indefinite frequency)
    - He quickly got dressed, (manner)

    c. end-position

    Adverbs of manner (how), place (where) and time (when) most often go in end-position.
    - She brushed her hair slowly. (manner)
    - The children are playing upstairs. (place)
    - I phoned Alex this morning. (time)
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