Prepositions - From

Prepositions - From

1. From indicates a source.

Pattern 1: verb + from + noun
Tony is from Alabama.
I hear from him every week.

Verbs commonly used before from:
be, call, come, derive, hear

Pattern 2: verb + noun + from + noun
We get help from our neighbors.

Verbs commonly used with this pattern:
borrow, bring, buy, collect, copy, get, mail, obtain, receive, send

2. From indicates a point of departure.

Pattern: verb + from + noun (place)
The ship sailed from San Francisco.
Please start from the beginning.

Typical verbs:
begin, depart, drive, fly, go, graduate, move, read, sail, start (over), take off

3. From can indicate separation.

Pattern 1: verb + away + from + noun
We ran away from the building.
Keep away from the crowd.

Typical verbs before away from:
drive, get, keep, move, run, walk

Pattern 2: verb + noun + from + noun
We collected the papers from the students.

Verbs commonly used with this pattern:
borrow, buy, chase, collect, delete, dissociate, eliminate, erase, expel, hide, keep (away), protect, release, remove, save, scare (away), separate, shield, steal, subtract, take (away)

4. From can indicate difference.

Pattern 1: number + from + number
Three from nine equals six.

Pattern 2: number + noun of time of distance + from
He lives five miles from here.
They are only twenty minutes (away) from the city.
I will see you two weeks from today.

Expressions:

be different from
My sweater is different from yours.
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    Mount Everest

    Mount Everest is the Earth's highest mountain, with a peak at 8,848 metres above sea level and the 5th tallest mountain measured from the centre of the Earth. It is located in the Mahalangur section of the Himalayas.

    Different kinds of adverbs go in different positions in a clause. Here are some general rules (Note: these rules apply both to one-word adverbs and to adverb phrases of two or more words.)

    Verb and object
    We do not usually put adverbs between a verb and its object.

    [...adverb + verb + object] [verb + adverb + object]
    I very much like my job. (NOT I like very much-my job.)
    [...verb + object + adverb]
    She speaks English well. (NOT She speaks well English.)

    Initial, mid and end position

    There are three normal positions for adverbs:
    a. initial position (at the beginning of a clause)
    - Yesterday morning something very strange happened.
    b. mid-position (with the verb - for the exact position)
    - My brother completely forgot my birthday.
    c. end position (at the end of a clause)
    - What are you doing tomorrow?
    Most adverb phrases (adverbs of two or more words) cannot go in mid-position. Compare:
    - He got dressed quickly. He quickly got dressed.
    - (Quickly can go in end or mid-position.)
    - He got dressed in a hurry. (NOT He in a hurry got dressed.)
    - (In a hurry cannot go in mid-position.)

    What goes where?
    a. initial position
    - Connecting adverbs (which join a clause to what came before). Time adverbs can also go here .
    - However, not everybody agreed. (connecting adverb)
    - Tomorrow I've got a meeting in Cardiff, (time adverb)

    b. mid-position
    - Focusing adverbs (which emphasize one part of the clause); adverbs of certainty and completeness; adverbs of indefinite frequency; some adverbs of manner.
    - He's been everywhere he's even been to Antarctica, (focusing adverb)
    - It will probably rain this evening, (certainty)
    - I've almost finished painting the house, (completeness)
    - My boss often travels to America, (indefinite frequency)
    - He quickly got dressed, (manner)

    c. end-position

    Adverbs of manner (how), place (where) and time (when) most often go in end-position.
    - She brushed her hair slowly. (manner)
    - The children are playing upstairs. (place)
    - I phoned Alex this morning. (time)
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