Prepositions - Close To

Prepositions - Close To

1. Close to means near.
Your house is close to the metro station.
They are sitting close to each other.

2. Close to indicates a very friendly or intimate relationship.
She is very close to her older sister.

3. Close to (adverb) can mean almost.
I wrote close to fifty invitations this morning.
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  • Prepositions - About
  • Prepositions - Above
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  • Prepositions - Besides
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  • Prepositions - But
  • Prepositions - By
  • Prepositions - Close To
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  • Prepositions - Down
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  • Prepositions - To
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  • Prepositions - Until
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    Different kinds of adverbs go in different positions in a clause. Here are some general rules (Note: these rules apply both to one-word adverbs and to adverb phrases of two or more words.)

    Verb and object
    We do not usually put adverbs between a verb and its object.

    [...adverb + verb + object] [verb + adverb + object]
    I very much like my job. (NOT I like very much-my job.)
    [...verb + object + adverb]
    She speaks English well. (NOT She speaks well English.)

    Initial, mid and end position

    There are three normal positions for adverbs:
    a. initial position (at the beginning of a clause)
    - Yesterday morning something very strange happened.
    b. mid-position (with the verb - for the exact position)
    - My brother completely forgot my birthday.
    c. end position (at the end of a clause)
    - What are you doing tomorrow?
    Most adverb phrases (adverbs of two or more words) cannot go in mid-position. Compare:
    - He got dressed quickly. He quickly got dressed.
    - (Quickly can go in end or mid-position.)
    - He got dressed in a hurry. (NOT He in a hurry got dressed.)
    - (In a hurry cannot go in mid-position.)

    What goes where?
    a. initial position
    - Connecting adverbs (which join a clause to what came before). Time adverbs can also go here .
    - However, not everybody agreed. (connecting adverb)
    - Tomorrow I've got a meeting in Cardiff, (time adverb)

    b. mid-position
    - Focusing adverbs (which emphasize one part of the clause); adverbs of certainty and completeness; adverbs of indefinite frequency; some adverbs of manner.
    - He's been everywhere he's even been to Antarctica, (focusing adverb)
    - It will probably rain this evening, (certainty)
    - I've almost finished painting the house, (completeness)
    - My boss often travels to America, (indefinite frequency)
    - He quickly got dressed, (manner)

    c. end-position

    Adverbs of manner (how), place (where) and time (when) most often go in end-position.
    - She brushed her hair slowly. (manner)
    - The children are playing upstairs. (place)
    - I phoned Alex this morning. (time)
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