Prepositions - Against

Prepositions - Against

  • Against means touching something or somebody for support.

    Pattern 1: verb + against + noun
    The man was leaning against his car.

    Typical verbs used before against:
    hang, lean, lie, rest, sleep

    Pattern 2: verb + noun + against + noun
    They held the mirror against the wall.

    Typical verbs used before against:
    butt, hold, keep, lay, lean, place, pull, put, rest, set

  • Against means touching forcibly.

    Pattern: noun + verb + against + noun
    The rain beat against the window.

    Verbs often used before against:
    bang, beat, crash, crush, heave, hit, knock, push, splash, throw, thrust

  • Against means in opposition to.

    Pattern: noun + verb + against + noun
    The mayor was against the idea of a new day-care center.
    Stealing is against the law.
    Our senator voted against that bill.

    Typical verbs used before against:
    act, argue, campaign, debate, fight, go, move, play, vote, work

    Nouns often used after against:
    action, bill, concept, enemy, force, idea, law, nomination, orders, plan, precepts, principles, proposal, regulations, religion, rules, suggestion, teachings, team, wishes

  • Against can mean toward a force in the opposite direction.

    Pattern: verb + against + the + noun
    Sailing was rough yesterday; we sailed against the wind all day.

    Typical verbs used before against:
    drive, fight, go, move, run, sail, struggle, swim, walk

    Nouns often used after against:
    current, flow, force, tide, wind

    Expression:
    against traffic—
    I drive against traffic because I live in the city and I work in the suburbs.

  • Against can mean to the disadvantage of.

    Pattern: noun + be + against + noun
    You may not get that job because your age is against you.
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  • Prepositions - About
  • Prepositions - Above
  • Prepositions - Across
  • Prepositions - After
  • Prepositions - Against
  • Prepositions - Ahead Of
  • Prepositions - Along
  • Prepositions - Among
  • Prepositions - Around
  • Prepositions - As
  • Prepositions - At
  • Prepositions - Back to/Back From
  • Prepositions - Before
  • Prepositions - Behind
  • Prepositions - Below
  • Prepositions - Beneath
  • Prepositions - Beside
  • Prepositions - Besides
  • Prepositions - Between
  • Prepositions - Beyond
  • Prepositions - But
  • Prepositions - By
  • Prepositions - Close To
  • Prepositions - Despite/In Spite Of
  • Prepositions - Down
  • Prepositions - During
  • Prepositions - Except
  • Prepositions - Far From
  • Prepositions - For
  • Prepositions - From
  • Prepositions - In
  • Prepositions - In Back Of
  • Prepositions - In Front Of
  • Prepositions - Inside
  • Prepositions - Instead Of
  • Prepositions - Into
  • Prepositions - Like
  • Prepositions - Near
  • Prepositions - Next To
  • Prepositions - Of
  • Prepositions - Off
  • Prepositions - On
  • Prepositions - On Top Of
  • Prepositions - Onto
  • Prepositions - Opposite
  • Prepositions - Out
  • Prepositions - Outside
  • Prepositions - Over
  • Prepositions - Past
  • Prepositions - Through
  • Prepositions - Throughout
  • Prepositions - To
  • Prepositions - Toward
  • Prepositions - Towards
  • Prepositions - Under
  • Prepositions - Underneath
  • Prepositions - Until
  • Prepositions - Up
  • Prepositions - With
  • Prepositions - Within
  • Prepositions - Without
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    Rules to play Ultimate Frisbee

    Play to 15 points

    Typically, a game of Ultimate Frisbee ends when one team scores 15 points, though you can amend this rule to fit your time constraints and your desires for the game. Typically, a game to 15 can take as long as an hour and a half, so you might want to play to seven or 10, if you dont have that long.

    English Phrases
    Different kinds of adverbs go in different positions in a clause. Here are some general rules (Note: these rules apply both to one-word adverbs and to adverb phrases of two or more words.)

    Verb and object
    We do not usually put adverbs between a verb and its object.

    [...adverb + verb + object] [verb + adverb + object]
    I very much like my job. (NOT I like very much-my job.)
    [...verb + object + adverb]
    She speaks English well. (NOT She speaks well English.)

    Initial, mid and end position

    There are three normal positions for adverbs:
    a. initial position (at the beginning of a clause)
    - Yesterday morning something very strange happened.
    b. mid-position (with the verb - for the exact position)
    - My brother completely forgot my birthday.
    c. end position (at the end of a clause)
    - What are you doing tomorrow?
    Most adverb phrases (adverbs of two or more words) cannot go in mid-position. Compare:
    - He got dressed quickly. He quickly got dressed.
    - (Quickly can go in end or mid-position.)
    - He got dressed in a hurry. (NOT He in a hurry got dressed.)
    - (In a hurry cannot go in mid-position.)

    What goes where?
    a. initial position
    - Connecting adverbs (which join a clause to what came before). Time adverbs can also go here .
    - However, not everybody agreed. (connecting adverb)
    - Tomorrow I've got a meeting in Cardiff, (time adverb)

    b. mid-position
    - Focusing adverbs (which emphasize one part of the clause); adverbs of certainty and completeness; adverbs of indefinite frequency; some adverbs of manner.
    - He's been everywhere — he's even been to Antarctica, (focusing adverb)
    - It will probably rain this evening, (certainty)
    - I've almost finished painting the house, (completeness)
    - My boss often travels to America, (indefinite frequency)
    - He quickly got dressed, (manner)

    c. end-position

    Adverbs of manner (how), place (where) and time (when) most often go in end-position.
    - She brushed her hair slowly. (manner)
    - The children are playing upstairs. (place)
    - I phoned Alex this morning. (time)
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    Prepositions
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