prepositions - toward

Prepositions - Toward

1. Toward means in the direction of a place.

Pattern 1: verb + toward + noun
She ran toward the playground to see her friends.
Let's head toward the park.

Typical verbs:
blow, fly, go, head, hike, look, march, move, point, run, sail, turn, walk

Pattern 2: verb + noun + toward + noun
He guided us toward the cave.
They directed the girls toward the path.

Typical verbs:
direct, guide, lead, push, pull, shove, throw

2. Toward indicates attitude about something.

Pattern 1: be + adjective + toward + noun
She is very affectionate toward her parents.
They have been cool toward his proposals.

Typical adjectives:
affectionate, charitable, considerate, cool, friendly, gracious, hospitable, inhospitable, menacing, spiteful, warm

Pattern 2: noun + toward + noun
His feelings toward her have not changed.

Typical nouns before toward:
attitude, behavior, conduct, demeanor, feelings

3. Toward indicates the direction of action.

Pattern: verb + toward + noun
They are heading toward an agreement.
We worked toward a happy conclusion for everyone.

Typical nouns after toward:
agreement, argument, conclusion, ending, goal, vote

Typical verbs:
head, lean, push, take steps, work

4. Toward indicates the object of a contribution or partial payment.

Pattern: verb + toward + noun
The money will go toward helping the family.
She contributes toward his monthly expenses.

Typical verbs:
contribute, donate, give, go, help
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  • Prepositions - About
  • Prepositions - Above
  • Prepositions - Across
  • Prepositions - After
  • Prepositions - Against
  • Prepositions - Ahead Of
  • Prepositions - Along
  • Prepositions - Among
  • Prepositions - Around
  • Prepositions - As
  • Prepositions - At
  • Prepositions - Back to/Back From
  • Prepositions - Before
  • Prepositions - Behind
  • Prepositions - Below
  • Prepositions - Beneath
  • Prepositions - Beside
  • Prepositions - Besides
  • Prepositions - Between
  • Prepositions - Beyond
  • Prepositions - But
  • Prepositions - By
  • Prepositions - Close To
  • Prepositions - Despite/In Spite Of
  • Prepositions - Down
  • Prepositions - During
  • Prepositions - Except
  • Prepositions - Far From
  • Prepositions - For
  • Prepositions - From
  • Prepositions - In
  • Prepositions - In Back Of
  • Prepositions - In Front Of
  • Prepositions - Inside
  • Prepositions - Instead Of
  • Prepositions - Into
  • Prepositions - Like
  • Prepositions - Near
  • Prepositions - Next To
  • Prepositions - Of
  • Prepositions - Off
  • Prepositions - On
  • Prepositions - On Top Of
  • Prepositions - Onto
  • Prepositions - Opposite
  • Prepositions - Out
  • Prepositions - Outside
  • Prepositions - Over
  • Prepositions - Past
  • Prepositions - Through
  • Prepositions - Throughout
  • Prepositions - To
  • Prepositions - Toward
  • Prepositions - Towards
  • Prepositions - Under
  • Prepositions - Underneath
  • Prepositions - Until
  • Prepositions - Up
  • Prepositions - With
  • Prepositions - Within
  • Prepositions - Without
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    Basic English Usage
  • We can put both (of) before nouns and pronouns.
    Before a noun with a determiner (for example: the, my, these), both and both of are both possible.
      Both (of) my parents like riding. She s eaten both (of) the chops.
    We can also use both without a determiner.
      She's eaten both chops. (= ... both of the chops.)
    Only both of is possible before a personal pronoun (us, you, them).
      Both of them can come tomorrow.
      Mary sends her love to both of us.
  • We can put both after object pronouns.
      I ve invited them both. Mary sends us both her love.
      I've made you both something to eat.
  • Note: we do not put the before both.
      both children(NOT the both children).
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