numbers

numbers

  • Fractions
      We say fractions like this:
      1/8 one eighth , 3/7 three sevenths
      2/5 two fifths, 11/16 eleven sixteenths
      We normally use a singular verb after fractions below 1.
      Three quarters of a ton is too much.
      We use a plural noun with fractions and decimals over 1.
  • Decimals
      We say decimal fractions like this:
      O'125 nought point one two five (NOT 0,125—nought comma one two five)
      3.7 three point seven
  • nought, zero, nil etc
      The figure 0 is usually called nought in British English, and zero in American English.
      When we say numbers one figure at a time, 0 is often called oh (like the letter 0).
      My account number is four one three oh six.
      In measurements of temperature, 0 is called zero.
      Zero degrees Centigrade is thirty-two degrees Fahrenheit.
      Zero scores in team games are called nil (American zero).
      Zero in tennis and similar games is called love.
  • Telephone numbers
      We say each figure separately. When the same figure comes twice, we usually say double (British English only).
      307 4922 three oh seven four nine double two.
  • Kings and Queens
      We say the numbers like this:
      Henry the i Louis the Fourteenth
      Henry VIII Louis XIV
  • Floors
      The ground floor of a British house is the first floor of an American house; the British first floor is the American second floor, etc.
    GB
    second floor first floor ground floor

    y

    IBM
    ip
    =i
    p|

    jo
    US
    third floor second floor first floor
  • and
      In British English, we use and between the hundreds and the tens in a number.
      310 three hundred and ten (US three hundred ten)
      5,642 five thousand, six hundred and forty-two
      Note that in writing we use commas (,) to separate thousands.
  • a and one
    We can say a hundred or one hundred, a thousand or one thousand. One is more formal.
      I want to live for a hundred years.
      Pay Mr J Baron one thousand pounds, (on a cheque)
      We only use a at the beginning of a number. Compare: a hundred three thousand one hundred We can use a with other measurement words. a pint a foot a mile.
  • Plurals without-s
    After a number or determiner, hundred, thousand, million and dozen have no final -s. Compare:
      five hundred pounds hundreds of pounds
      several thousand times It cost thousands
      Other number expressions have no -s when they are used as adjectives.
      a five-pound note a three-mile walk
  • Measurements
      We use be in measurements.
      She's five feet eight (inches tall).
      I'm sixty-eight kilos.
      What shoe size are you?
      In an informal style, we often use foot instead of feefwhen we talk about people's heights.
      My father's six foot two.
  • Money
      1p one penny (informal: one p /pi:/) or a penny 5p five pence (informal: five p)
      £3.75 three pounds seventy-five When we use sums of money as adjectives, we use singular forms. a five pound note (NOT a five-pounds note)
  • Adjectives
    When expressions of measurement, amount and quantity are used as adjectives, they are normally singular.
      a ten-mile walk (HOT a ten-miles walk)
      six two-hour lessons
      a three-month-old baby
      We can use possessives in expressions of time.
      a week's holiday four days ' journey
  • there are . ..
    When we count the number of people in a group, we often use the structure there are + number + of+ pronoun.
      There are only seven of us here today.
      There were twelve of us in my family.
  • Spoken calculations
    Common ways of calculating are:
      2 + 2 = 4 two and two is/are four (informal)
      two plus two equals four (formal)
      7-4 = 3 four from seven is three (informal)
      seven minus four equals three (formal)
      3 x 4 = 12
      three fours are twelve (informal)
      three multiplied by four equals twelve (formal)
      9 / 3 = 3
      nine divided by three equals three
  • --- >>>
  • 'copula1 verbs
  • 'social' language
  • (a) few and (a) little
  • (a)round and about
  • (be) used to + noun or... -ing
  • (Great) Britain, the United Kingdom, the British Isles and England
  • -ing form ('gerund')
  • -ing form after to
  • -ing form or infinitive?
  • abbreviations
  • about to
  • above and over
  • across and over
  • across and through
  • active verb forms
  • actual(ly)
  • adjectives ending in -Iy
  • adjectives without nouns
  • adjectives: order
  • adjectives: position
  • adverbs of manner
  • adverbs: position (details)
  • adverbs: position (general)
  • after (conjunction)
  • after (preposition); afterwards (adverb)
  • after all
  • afternoon, evening and night
  • ages
  • ago
  • all (of) with nouns and pronouns
  • all and every
  • all and whole
  • all right
  • all with verbs
  • all, everybody and everything
  • almost and nearly
  • also, as well and too
  • although and though
  • among and between
  • and
  • and after try, wait, go etc
  • another
  • any (= 'it doesn't matter which')
  • any and no: adverbs
  • appear
  • articles: a and an; pronunciation of the
  • articles: a/an
  • articles: countable and uncountable nouns
  • articles: introduction
  • articles: special rules and exceptions
  • articles: talking in general
  • articles: the
  • articles: the difference between a/an and the
  • as and like
  • as if and as though
  • as much/many ... as ...
  • as well as
  • as, because and since (reason)
  • as, when and while (things happening at the same time)
  • as...as ...
  • ask
  • at all
  • at, in and on (place)
  • at, in and on (time)
  • be + infinitive
  • be with auxiliary do
  • be: progressive tenses
  • because and because of
  • before (adverb)
  • before (conjunction)
  • before (preposition) and in front of
  • begin and start
  • big, large, great and tall
  • born
  • borrow and lend
  • both (of) with nouns and pronouns
  • both with verbs
  • both... and...
  • bring and take
  • British and American English
  • broad and wide
  • but = except
  • by: time
  • can and could: ability
  • can and could: forms
  • can with remember, understand, speak, play, see, hear, feel, taste and smell
  • can: permission, offers, requests and orders
  • can: possibility and probability
  • close and shut
  • come and go
  • comparison: comparative and superlative adjectives
  • comparison: comparative and superlative adverbs
  • comparison: much, far etc with comparatives
  • comparison: using comparatives and superlatives
  • conditional
  • conjunctions
  • contractions
  • countable and uncountable nouns
  • country
  • dare
  • dates
  • determiners
  • discourse markers
  • do + -ing
  • do and make
  • do: auxiliary verb
  • during and for
  • during and in
  • each and every
  • each other and one another
  • each: grammar
  • either... or...
  • either: determiner
  • ellipsis (leaving words out)
  • else
  • emphasis
  • emphatic structures with it and what
  • enjoy
  • enough
  • even
  • eventual(ly)
  • ever
  • every and every one
  • except
  • except and except for
  • exclamations
  • excuse me, pardon and sorry
  • expect, hope, look forward, wait, want and wish
  • explain
  • fairly, quite, rather and pretty
  • far and a long way
  • farther and further
  • fast
  • feel
  • fewer and less
  • for + object + infinitive
  • for, since, from, ago and before
  • for: purpose
  • future perfect
  • future progressive
  • future: introduction
  • future: present progressive and going to
  • future: shall and will (interpersonal uses)
  • future: shall/will (predictions)
  • future: simple present
  • gender (masculine and feminine language)
  • get (+ object) + verb form
  • get + noun, adjective, adverb particle or preposition
  • get and go: movement
  • go ... -ing
  • go meaning'become'
  • go: been and gone
  • had better
  • half (of)
  • hard and hardly
  • have (got) to
  • have (got): possession, relationships etc
  • have + object + verb form
  • have: actions
  • have: auxiliary verb
  • have: introduction
  • hear and listen (to)
  • help
  • here and there
  • holiday and holidays
  • home
  • hope
  • how and what... like?
  • if only
  • if so and if not
  • if-sentences with could and might
  • if: ordinary tenses
  • if: special tenses
  • ill and sick
  • imperative
  • in and into (prepositions)
  • in case
  • in spite of
  • indeed
  • infinitive after who, what, how etc
  • infinitive of purpose
  • infinitive without to
  • infinitive: negative, progressive, perfect, passive
  • infinitive: use
  • instead of... -ing
  • inversion: auxiliary verb before subject
  • inversion: whole verb before subject
  • irregular verbs
  • it's time
  • it: preparatory object
  • it: preparatory subject
  • last and the last
  • let's
  • letters
  • likely
  • long and for a long time
  • look
  • look (at), watch and see
  • marry and divorce
  • may and might: forms
  • may and might: permission
  • may and might: probability
  • mind
  • modal auxiliary verbs
  • more (of): determiner
  • most (of): determiner
  • much (of), many (of): determiners
  • much, many, a lot etc
  • must and have to; mustn't, haven't got to, don't have to, don't need to and needn't
  • must: deduction
  • must: forms
  • must: obligation
  • names and titles
  • nationality words
  • need
  • negative questions
  • negative structures
  • neither (of): determiner
  • neither, nor and not... either
  • neither... nor...
  • next and nearest
  • next and the next
  • no and none
  • no and not
  • no and not a/not any
  • no more, not any more, no longer, not any longer
  • non-progressive verbs
  • noun + noun
  • numbers
  • once
  • one and you: indefinite personal pronouns
  • one: substitute word
  • other and others
  • ought
  • own
  • participle clauses
  • participles used as adjectives
  • participles: 'present' and 'past' participles (-ing and -ed)
  • passive structures: introduction
  • passive verb forms
  • past tense with present or future meaning
  • past time: past perfect simple and progressive
  • past time: past progressive
  • past time: present perfect progressive
  • past time: present perfect simple
  • past time: simple past
  • past time: the past and perfect tenses (introduction)
  • perfect tenses with this is the first time..., etc
  • personal pronouns (I, me, it etc)
  • play and game
  • please and thank you
  • possessive with determiners (a friend of mine, etc)
  • possessive's: forms
  • possessive's: use
  • possessives: my and mine, etc
  • prepositional verbs and phrasal verbs
  • prepositions after particular words and expressions
  • prepositions and adverb particles
  • prepositions at the end of clauses
  • prepositions before particular words and expressions
  • prepositions: expressions without prepositions
  • present tenses: introduction
  • present tenses: present progressive
  • present tenses: simple present
  • progressive tenses with always
  • punctuation: apostrophe
  • punctuation: colon
  • punctuation: comma
  • punctuation: dash
  • punctuation: quotation marks
  • punctuation: semi-colons and full stops
  • question tags
  • questions: basic rules
  • questions: reply questions
  • questions: word order in spoken questions
  • quite
  • real(ly)
  • reflexive pronouns
  • relative pronouns
  • relative pronouns: what
  • relative pronouns: whose
  • relatives: identifying and non-identifying clauses
  • remind
  • reported speech and direct speech
  • reported speech: orders, requests, advice etc
  • reported speech: pronouns; 'here and now' words; tenses
  • reported speech: questions
  • requests
  • road and street
  • say and tell
  • see
  • seem
  • shall
  • short answers
  • should
  • should after why and how
  • should and would
  • should, ought and must
  • should: (If I were you) I should ...
  • similar words
  • since (conjunction of time): tenses
  • singular and plural: anybody etc
  • singular and plural: irregular plurals
  • singular and plural: plural expressions with singular verbs
  • singular and plural: pronunciation of plural nouns
  • singular and plural: singular words ending in -s
  • singular and plural: singular words with plural verbs
  • singular and plural: spelling of plural nouns
  • slow(ly)
  • small and little
  • smell
  • so am I, so do I etc
  • so and not with hope, believe etc
  • some and any
  • some/any and no article
  • some: special uses
  • somebody and anybody, something and anything, etc
  • sound
  • spelling and pronunciation
  • spelling: -ise and -ize
  • spelling: -ly
  • spelling: capital letters
  • spelling: ch and tch, k and ck
  • spelling: doubling final consonants
  • spelling: final -e
  • spelling: full stops with abbreviations
  • spelling: hyphens
  • spelling: ie and ei
  • spelling: y and i
  • still, yet and already
  • subject and object forms
  • subjunctive
  • such and so
  • suggest
  • surely
  • sympathetic
  • take
  • take (time)
  • tall and high
  • taste
  • telephoning
  • telling the time
  • tenses in subordinate clauses
  • that: omission
  • the same
  • there is
  • think
  • this and that
  • too
  • travel, journey and trip
  • unless and if not
  • until and by
  • until and to
  • used to + infinitive
  • verbs with object complements
  • verbs with two objects
  • way
  • weak and strong forms
  • well
  • when and if
  • whether and if
  • whether... or...
  • which, what and who: question words
  • who ever, what ever, how ever etc
  • whoever, whatever, whichever, however, whenever and wherever
  • will
  • wish
  • worth ... -ing
  • would
  • would rather
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    Prepositions
  • What is different from other relative pronouns.
    Other relative pronouns usually refer to a noun that comes before.
      I gave her the money that she needed.
      The thing that I'd like most is a home computer.
      (That refers to— repeats the meaning of— the money and the thing.)
      We use what as [noun + relative pronoun] together.
      I gave her what she needed. (What = the money that.)
      What I'd like most is a home computer. (What = the thing that.)
  • Do not use what with the same meaning as that.
      You can have everything (that) you like.
      (NOT . . . -everything what you like.)
      The only thing that makes me feel better is coffee.
      (NOT The only thing what . . .)
      We use which, not what, to refer to a whole sentence that comes before.
      _^ -1
      'Sally married George,' which made Paul very unhappy.
      (NOT. . . -what made Paul very unhappy.)
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